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The department is committed to continuous review, identification of opportunities and implementing improvements to facilitate the same opportunities for people with disability and their families and carers to access its sporting, recreational, arts and cultural services, information and facilities.

The Disability Access and Inclusion Plan (DAIP) 2018-2019

The Disability Access and Inclusion Plan (DAIP) 2018-2019 builds on the previous individual DAIPs of the former departments. This DAIP has been developed in accordance with the Disability Services Act 1993 and outlines the strategies the department intends to implement to assist people with disability and their families and carers to utilise the department’s services, facilities and information; providing them with the same opportunities, rights and responsibilities enjoyed by all other people in the community.

Access and inclusion policy statement

The department is committed to continuous review, identification of opportunities and implementing improvements to facilitate the same opportunities for people with disability and their families and carers to access its sporting, recreational, arts and cultural services, information and facilities.

The department will promote its DAIP and ensure that disability awareness information is communicated to its officers, key stakeholders, contractors and volunteers, and ensure that this information is updated as required.

The department is committed to ensuring that people with disability can participate in shaping its services and objectives through a consultative process.

DAIP outcomes

The department’s commitment is demonstrated in the DAIP through the identification of strategies where access and inclusion can be improved, to progress towards the following outcomes:

  • People with disability have the same opportunities as other people to access the services of, and any events organised by, the department.
  • People with disability have the same opportunities as other people to access the buildings and other facilities of the department.
  • People with disability receive information from the department in a format that will enable them to access the information as readily as other people are able to access it.
  • People with disability receive the same level and quality of services from the staff of the department as other people receive from the staff of the department.
  • People with disability have the same opportunities as other people to make complaints to the department.
  • People with disability have the same opportunities as other people to participate in any public consultation by the department.
  • People with disability have the same opportunities as other people to obtain and maintain employment with the department.

Consultation

Consultation has been undertaken individually by the former departments that were amalgamated to form the department. This included:

  • Examination of relevant department documents and strategies
  • Investigation of contemporary trends and good practice in access and inclusion
  • Consultation with key staff
  • Consultation with the community

In June 2017, the former Department of Culture and The Arts engaged DADAA to perform a consultation with DLGSC-funded agencies as well as with artists and audiences with disability, their families and carers.
The department placed an item on the homepage of its website inviting the community to provide input into the development of the department’s DAIP and placed an advertisement in the West Australian newspaper calling for comment from the public.

Identified barriers

The barriers outlined below were identified via the consultation.

Leadership

  • Most DAIPs are held in the hands of a few internal champions. In the absence of these champions, DAIPs become a compliance exercise to report against, rather than meaningful guides.
  • Structural changes within State Government have led to a ‘wait and see’ approach, resulting in lack of funding prioritisation to DAIP strategies and initiatives.

Employee awareness

  • Overwhelmingly, staff are uninformed of their organisation’s DAIP preparation and implementation.
  • Responsibility for the DAIP was largely seen as a front-of-house responsibility, yet staff are not always well-trained or knowledgeable about information relevant to visitors with disability.

Marketing and communications

  • Little awareness of targeted marketing to people with disability, their families and carers.

Partnerships with the disability sector

  • Little or ad-hoc partnering with disability organisations.

NDIS

  • Low awareness of the National Disability Insurance Scheme and its implications for sector organisations.

Venues and buildings

  • Venue accessibility is inconsistent – some physical barriers remain with a need to audit the non-automatic doors in some venues.
  • Budgetary constraints have a significant impact on this area.

Alternative information formats

  • A range of alternative formats exist, however a comprehensive suite of formats for all disabilities does not exist.
  • Websites are suitably accessible, but not all are fully accessible.
  • The deaf community is poorly catered for.

Assistive technologies

  • Assistive technology uptake is haphazard and there is no consistent approach to universal access.

Budgets

  • Budgetary constraints to implementation of DAIP strategies and initiatives.

General

People with musculoskeletal disability make up the group best catered for, while the deaf community is the most poorly accommodated.

DAIP strategies

The department has identified the following strategies to achieve the DAIP outcomes:

Outcome 1: People with disability have the same opportunities as other people to access the services of, and any events organised by, the department.

  1. Improve access and inclusion for people with disability to department funded services, events and programs.
  2. Partner with disability organisations to raise disability awareness and practical implications to inform service delivery.
  3. Ensure that staff, contractors, agents of the department and funded organisations are aware of the requirements of the Disability Services Act 1993 and comply with the DAIP.

Outcome 2: People with disability have the same opportunities as other people to access the buildings and other facilities of the Department.

  1. Ensure the department’s buildings and facilities meet disability access standards, where possible.
  2. Ensure community consultation is prioritised and establish an evidence-base to inform accessibility planning and design for buildings.
  3. Develop complementary facilities, policies and procedures to support disability access to buildings.
  4. Develop signage strategies across venues to assist with reducing anxiety for people with disability in accessing services. Ensure the department’s buildings and facilities meet disability access standards, where possible.

Outcome 3: People with disability receive information from the department in a format that will enable them to access the information as readily as other people are able to access it.

  1. Ensure information provided for people with disability complies with State Government Access Guidelines for Information, Services and Facilities.
  2. Ensure information is available in alternative formats suitable to people with disability on request.
  3. Ensure staff are aware of accessible information needs and how to obtain information in other formats.
  4. Utilise established media channels promote services to people with disability.
  5. Provide interpreter services for key services where people are not able to communication effectively in written and/or spoken english.

Outcome 4: People with disability receive the same level and quality of services from the staff of the department as other people receive from the staff of the department.

  1. Ensure staff have the knowledge and skills to provide an equal level and quality of service to people with disability and their families and carers.
  2. Raise awareness and monitor that staff, contractors, agents of the department and funded organisations offer a standard of customer service to people with disability at a level that is at least the same as to those who do not.
  3. Develop a contemporary suite of policies that reflect the access and participation needs of people with disability (including those with mental health) that want to engage with sport, recreation, arts and culture.
  4. Incorporate access and inclusion budget lines to address the implementation of the DAIP.

Outcome 5: People with disability have the same opportunities as other people to make complaints to the department.

  1. Ensure the department’s complaints management system and processes are accessible to people with disability.
  2. Ensure staff are adequately trained to facilitate, respond to and process complaints from people with disability.

Outcome 6: People with disability have the same opportunities as other people to participate in any public consultation by the department.

  1. Ensure accessible venues are selected and appropriate protocols are established and implemented to support community consultation to ensure inclusion for people with disability.
  2. Ensure communication and promotion of community consultations are provided in alternative for people with disability.

Outcome 7: People with disability have the same opportunities as other people to obtain and maintain employment with a public authority.

  1. Develop strategies and policies to improve attraction, recruitment and retention of staff with disability.
  2. Provide appropriate training to staff and selection panels on how to communicate with people with disability.
  3. Ensure departmental staff are supported and empowered to undertaken their employment responsibilities.
  4. Ensure the department’s recruitment policies, procedures, templates and language format are accessible to people disability.

Promotion and communications

Following endorsement by the department’s Corporate Executive and the Department of Communities, the DAIP will be promoted on the Department’s website and through an advertisement in The West Australian.

Alternative formats

In accordance with the Disability Services Act 1993 s29A, and the Disability Service Regulations 2004, the department will ensure that the DAIP is available to people with disability and the general public upon request, in electronic format by email; in hard copy format in both standard and large print; in audio format; on compact disc; and on the website at www.dlgsc.wa.gov.au.

Implementation

In accordance with the Disability Services Act 1993 s29B, the department will take all practicable measures to ensure that its officers, staff, agents and contractors contributes to the DAIP’s implementation. The department will develop a DAIP implementation plan to facilitate this. The obligations of agents and contractors to the department’s DAIP will be included in the relevant contracts and agreements binding the parties.

Review

The department’s DAIP will be reviewed on an annual basis.

Reporting

In accordance with the Public Sector Commission’s Annual Reporting Framework, the department will report on the implementation of the DAIP in its annual report.

Page reviewed 19 March 2019